Yoga, Pilates, Stretching and Massage. Practice these as much as possible. Therapeutic Pain Relief, Santa Barbara, Goleta

Why do Yoga, Pilates, Stretching and Massage work together?

It is hard to find a better combination of relaxation, increased circulation, and range of motion. Yoga and massage can work together to relieve stress and tension throughout your life. Yogis need a massage and massage therapists and bodyworkers need yoga. The two arts are sisters. Therapists’ knowledge of yoga informs their creativity as bodyworkers, while their knowledge of body mechanics enhances their own yoga practice and teaching. For their yoga-practicing clients, massage therapists can sweep away the tension remaining after a yoga session, thereby facilitating the transformative nature of yoga. Yoga and massage have a lot in common. Yoga is actually a form of self-massage. You lengthen and breathe space into areas that are tight. You massage the internal organs through bending and twisting, breathing nourishing breaths throughout the entire session. Both yoga and massage detoxify the body, increasing circulation in the blood and lymphatic system. And just as you might be a bit more in the most healthy way possible after a yoga practice (or a workout), a deep massage can leave some tender spots asking for time to sort themselves out. One of the differences about massage is that you have to trust the person who is working on you, as massage is not self-inflicted like yoga. A good massage therapist helps you relax and feel comfortable, but you need to do your part to relax as well.  This is so important; because a therapist can’t really do their best work if you’re fighting them by tensing up. The same element of relaxation applies to yoga. There has to be integration and strength, of course, but there also must be spaciousness to allow the nourishing breath and circulation to do their work. You have to find the right balance of effort and ease, strength and surrender, to ultimately find freedom. If you are being treated for pain by a massage therapist they may recommend some healing yoga poses to help you recover from injury faster and live pain-free sooner. There are many overlaps between the two and treating your body to both massage therapy and regular yoga sessions will help you find greater balance in your life.
Riktr Pro Massage can be healing, cat-like, relaxing flowers or deep tissue bodywork for sports injuries and muscular and or emotional pain. (We all have holding patterns in our bodies according to Ida Rolf and John F. Barnes.) Nicola, LMT

Nicola of Riktr Pro Massage is a practicing licensed insured professional LMT (Licensed Massage Therapist) and fine artist based in Santa Barbara, CA. Nicola has a wide range of female and male clients, including athletes, professionals, housewives, artists, landscapers, out of town visitors, people who are retired and students. He is very flexible in scheduling appointments at his studio in Santa Barbara. You can also make appointments at Holistic Centers in Santa Barbara, Buellton, Key2Fitness plus Nicola offers In or Outcall Mobile Massage in Santa Barbara, Ventura, Montecito, Carpinteria, Summerland, Goleta, San Ynez Valley, Buellton, Ca.

  • “If you appreciate high-quality bodywork or just want to RELAX and go to “LA LA LAND” call Riktr Pro Massage.  Are you a serious athlete and need EXTREME bodywork or “FIX IT” work, weekend warrior, stressed out professional or student? Maybe you are going through tough life issues, have athletic injuries or just want to keep that body tuned up and healthy? Then you have finally found your Santa Barbara Licensed and Insured Pro Massage Therapist. Nicola will always personalize your massage session to fit your physical and emotional needs.”
Our Journey in Life
Our Journey in Life

Services 

Riktr Pro Massage offers a wide range of services, including:

In Call Massage @ my Studio or 3 Other Locations in the Tri-Counties Area

Mobile and Out Call Massage to your Location

Massage Modalities

Ashiatsu Shiatsu Massage

Athletic Event Massage

Barefoot Deep Tissue Massage

Barefoot Shiatsu

Chair Massage

-Chi Nei Tsang (CNT)

Compression Massage, Ischemic or Static Pressure

-Cupping Therapy

Deep Tissue Massage

Healing Massage for Depression and Anxiety

Manual Lymphatic, Drainage Pump, Lymphedema

Myofascial Release

Neuromuscular Release

Orthopedic Massage  (OM) 

Post-Operative / Surgical Massage

Reflexology

Relaxing Massage

Scar Tissue Massage

Sports and Injury Massage

Sports Stretch Massage, Fascial Stretch FST & Self Stretching

Swedish Massage

Trigger Point

Call or text 805-637-7482

for appointments  

        No Solicitations

 Yoga

what-is-yoga

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Yoga (/ˈjɡə/; Sanskrit: योग, Listen) is a physical, mental, and spiritual practice or discipline. There is a broad variety of schools, practices and goals[1] in Hinduism, Buddhism (including Vajrayana and Tibetan Buddhism[2][3][4]) and Jainism.[5][6][7][6] The best-known are Hatha yoga and Raja yoga.

The origins of Yoga have been speculated to date back to pre-Vedic Indian traditions, but most likely developed around the sixth and fifth centuries BCE, in ancient India’s ascetic circles, which are also credited with the early sramana movements.[8][note 1] The chronology of earliest texts describing yoga-practices is unclear, varyingly credited to Hindu Upanishads[9] and Buddhist Pāli Canon,[10] probably of third century BCE or later. The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali from first half of 1st millennium CE is one of a key surviving major texts on Yoga.[11][12] Yoga which is popular today and involves physical exercises is actually Hatha Yoga and has its origins in medieval period. Hatha yoga texts emerged around 11th century CE, and in its origins was related to Tantrism.[13][14]

Yoga gurus from India later introduced yoga to the west,[15] following the success of Swami Vivekananda in the late 19th and early 20th century.[15] In the 1980s, yoga became popular as a system of physical exercise across the Western world.[14] Yoga in Indian traditions, however, is more than physical exercise, it has a meditative and spiritual core.[16] One of the six major orthodox schools of Hinduism is also called Yoga, which has its own epistemology and metaphysics, and is closely related to Hindu Samkhya philosophy.[17]

Many studies have tried to determine the effectiveness of yoga as a complementary intervention for cancer, schizophrenia, asthma, and heart disease. The results of these studies[18][19] have been mixed and inconclusive, with cancer studies suggesting none to unclear effectiveness, and others suggesting yoga may reduce risk factors and aid in a patient’s psychological healing process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goal of Yoga

The ultimate goal of Yoga is moksha (liberation) through the exact definition of what form this takes depends on the philosophical or theological system with which it is conjugated.

According to Jacobsen, “Yoga has five principal meanings:[27]

  1. Yoga as a disciplined method for attaining a goal;
  2. Yoga as techniques of controlling the body and the mind;
  3. Yoga as a name of one of the schools or systems of philosophy (darśana);
  4. Yoga in connection with other words, such as “hatha-, mantra-, and laya-,” referring to traditions specializing in particular techniques of yoga;
  5. Yoga as the goal of Yoga practice.”[27]

According to David Gordon White, from the 5th century CE onward, the core principles of “yoga” were more or less in place, and variations of these principles developed in various forms over time:[28]

  1. Yoga as an analysis of perception and cognition; illustration of this principle is found in Hindu texts such as the Bhagavad Gita and Yogasutras, as well as a number of Buddhist Mahāyāna works;[29]
  2. Yoga as the rising and expansion of consciousness; these are discussed in sources such as Hinduism Epic Mahābhārata, Jainism Praśamaratiprakarana;[30]
  3. Yoga as a path to omniscience; examples are found in Hinduism Nyaya and Vaisesika school texts as well as Buddhism Mādhyamaka texts, but in different ways;[31]
  4. Yoga as a technique for entering into other bodies, generating multiple bodies, and the attainment of other supernatural accomplishments; these are described in Tantric literature of Hinduism and Buddhism, as well as the Buddhist Sāmaññaphalasutta;[32]

White clarifies that the last principle relates to legendary goals of “yogi practice”, different from practical goals of “yoga practice,” as they are viewed in South Asian thought and practice since the beginning of the Common Era, in the various Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain philosophical schools.[33]

 

Yoga-JK what-is-yoga What-Is-Yoga

Pilates

Pi·la·tes
pəˈläˌdēz/
noun
noun: Pilates
  1. a system of exercises using special apparatus, designed to improve physical strength, flexibility, and posture, and enhance mental awareness. “this quest for better training has led many dancers to Pilates”

    Pilates is a form of exercise, developed by Joseph Pilates, which emphasizes the balanced development of the body through core strength, flexibility, and awareness in order to support efficient, graceful movement.

    Pilates is one of the most popular exercise systems in the country.

    It seems like everyone is either doing Pilates, or interested in starting a Pilates exercise program. Indeed, one of the best things about the Pilates method is that it works so well for a wide range of people. Athletes and dancers love it, as do seniors, women rebounding from pregnancy, and people who at various stages of physical rehabilitation.
    Read: Who Does Pilates?

    The top benefits doing of Pilates exercise that people report are that they become stronger, longer, leaner, and more able to do anything with grace and ease.

    Pilates is an Adaptable Method

    A modification is a key to Pilates exercise success with a variety of populations. All exercises are developed with modifications that can make a workout safe and can be challenging for a person at any level.

    Core Strength

     

    Core strength is the foundation of Pilates exercise. The core muscles are the deep, internal muscles of the abdomen and back. When the core muscles are strong and doing their job, as they are trained to do in Pilates, they work in tandem with the more superficial muscles of the trunk to support the spine and movement.

    As you develop your core strength you develop stability throughout your entire torso. This is one of the ways Pilates helps people overcome back pain. As the trunk is properly stabilized, pressure on the back is relieved and the body is able to move freely and efficiently.

    The Six Pilates Principles:

    Centering, Control, Flow, Breath, Precision, and Concentration:
    These six Pilates principles are essential ingredients in a high-quality Pilates workout.

    The Pilates method has always emphasized quality over quantity, and you will find that, unlike many systems of exercise, Pilates exercises do not include a lot of repetitions for each move. Instead, doing each exercise fully, with precision, yields significant results in a shorter time than one would ever imagine.
    Read The Six Pilates Principles for more on these important philosophical foundations of Pilates.

    Pilates is a Unique Method of Exercise.

    Core strength and torso stability, along with the six Pilates principles, set the Pilates method apart from many other types of exercise. Weight lifting, for example, can put a lot of attention on arm or leg strength without attending much to the fact that those parts are connected to the rest of the body! Even running or swimming can seem like all arms and legs, with either a floppy or overly tense core. Ultimately those who really succeed at their sport learn to use their core muscles, but in Pilates, this integrative approach is learned from the beginning.

    Mat Work and Equipment

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    What-Is-Pilates

     

     

    Pilates exercises are done on either on a mat on the floor, Pilates mat work, or on exercise equipment developed by Joseph Pilates. The workout equipment that we use in Pilates generally utilizes pulleys and resistance from the participants own body weight on the machine and graduated levels of springs. The reformer is probably the best-known piece of resistance equipment that you will encounter at a Pilates studio.

    Joseph Pilates

    The Pilates Method of the exercise was developed by Joseph Pilates in the 1920s. It was originally used as a rehabilitation program for prisoners of war and was later found to be of great benefit to anyone seeking a higher level of fitness. The work was kept alive over the years by a small group of Joseph Pilates devoted students until just a few years ago, when exercise science caught up to the principles that Pilates had been teaching all along, and now we enjoy the rich evolution of the Pilates work that we

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pilates (/pɪˈlɑːtz/;[1] German: [piˈlaːtəs]) is a physical fitness system developed in the early 20th century by the Greek German-born Joseph Pilates (Greek: Ιωσήφ Πιλάτος). It is especially practiced in the United States (where Pilates lived, developed and taught his method) and the United Kingdom (where he lived and taught early stages of his method). As of 2005, there were 11 million people practicing the discipline regularly and 14,000 instructors in the United States.[2]

Pilates called his method “Contrology” (from “control” and Greek -λογία, -logia).[3]

 

 

Stretching

stretching1 psoas-stretches-stretch-11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stretching is a form of physical exercise in which a specific muscle or tendon (or muscle group) is deliberately flexed or stretched in order to improve the muscle’s felt elasticity and achieve comfortable muscle tone.[1] The result is a feeling of increased muscle control, flexibility, and range of motion. Stretching is also used therapeutically to alleviate cramps.[2]

In its most basic form, stretching is a natural and instinctive activity; it is performed by humans and many other animals. It can be accompanied by yawning. Stretching often occurs instinctively after waking from sleep, after long periods of inactivity, or after exiting confined spaces and areas.

Increasing flexibility through stretching is one of the basic tenets of physical fitness. It is common for athletes to stretch before and after exercise in order to reduce injury and increase performance.[3]

Stretching can be dangerous when performed incorrectly. There are many techniques for stretching in general, but depending on which muscle group is being stretched, some techniques may be ineffective or detrimental, even to the point of causing tears, hypermobility, instability, or permanent damage to the tendons, ligaments, and muscle fiber.[4] The physiological nature of stretching and theories about the effect of various techniques are therefore subject to heavy inquiry.

Stretching11 Stretch out those legs

 

 

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*Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition.
The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended as diagnosis, treatment, or prescription of any kind. The decision to use, or not to use, any information is the sole responsibility of the reader. These statements are not expressions of legal opinion relative to the scope of practice, medical diagnosis or medical advice, nor do they represent an endorsement of any product, company or specific massage therapy technique, modality or approach. All trademarks, registered trademarks, brand names, registered brand names, logos, and company logos referenced in this post are the property of their owners.

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